Pocket Cruisers Unite!

December 16, 2014

Anytime you talk about pocket cruisers you have to clarify what you mean, for the term is loosely applied to a wide range of small boats, some with very little in common besides displacement. Size is certainly a factor, but size is relative. I’ve seen 26-feet length overall (LOA) being a commonly cited as the upper limit for the “pocket” appellation, and that seems about right, although a few decades ago a 26-foot sailboat was called something else—a yacht.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 12:53PM Comments (6)

What's This? Twenty Somethings at a Boat Show?

December 9, 2014

I got the impression that most of the young sailors were looking for boat show deals on gear and ideas on how to improve their own Pearson 26s, but seeing so many young faces was encouraging nevertheless. I sense that the growing number of blogs and YouTube videos created by young people engaged in the adventure of a lifetime are gradually filtering down to other sailors. Is cruising going viral among younger sailors? Given the state of the economy and the lack of opportunity for newly minted grads, I wouldn't blame them for shoving off. The economic doldrums of the eighties was one of the reasons Theresa and I took off at 22 and 23 respectively.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 11:52PM Comments (6)

Aground! Vestas Wind's Volvo Race Oops

December 2, 2014

I’ve put enough boats on rocks and shoals and had enough near misses to sympathize with the skipper and crew of Vestas Wind, who piled up the multi-million-dollar Volvo Ocean 65 on Cargados Carajos Shoal in the Indian Ocean on Nov. 29. The accident occurred during Leg Two (Cape Town to Abu Dhabi) of the Volvo Ocean Race, the most widely followed around-the-world racing event on the planet. Thankfully, all the sailors on board were rescued safely. At the time of this writing, the fate of the boat is still undetermined, but the longer it pounds on the reef, the less likely it seems that the boat will be able to continue racing.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 11:31AM Comments (3)

Florida Anchoring Survey: Here Today, Gone—

November 25, 2014

I don’t want to come down too hard on the good people at Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission; many of the underpaid, overworked officers seem genuinely interested in doing the right thing. But the most recent survey, and the accompanying “informational” video preceding it, lead me to believe that the FWC has been puffing swamp gas again. …
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 12:32PM Comments (17)

The Mystery Chain from China

November 17, 2014

Surprisingly, one of the best chains in our most recent test was one of the generic Chinese chains. This chain showed good strength, and had a thick galvanized coating that showed a high resistance flaking and abrasion. However, the other generic Chinese chain in our test showed appalling performance, so bad, that we believe it is unconscionable for any marine chandler to sell it. And here is the quandary. We’ve identified a promising, economically-priced chain, but it is virtually impossible for the average boater to distinguish it from junk.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson with Jonathan Neeves at 04:53PM Comments (3)

Tackling Fuel Tank Replacement

November 11, 2014

November is the time of year when the procrastinating catches up to us. The big projects we avoided all summer stare us in the face. Do nothing, and you risk a summer wasted pulling epoxy from your hair instead of sailing. If your boat is 20 years old or older, a fuel tank replacement—a bear of a project, even in ideal circumstances—might be that project you’re postponing. If it is, well, you’re in luck, because we’ve got a fair bit of information to help guide you through the process.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson with Steve D'Antonio at 12:26PM Comments (3)

Helping Your Boat Battery Survive Winter Storage

November 4, 2014

Few things are more disappointing than coming back to your boat in the spring and discovering that one or more of your boat’s batteries is dead. You haven’t even started sailing, and already you’re facing a hefty bill. Many times, a dead battery can be resuscitated to near its initial capacity, but it's best to avoid the problem in the first place.
Posted by at 11:10AM Comments (6)

Boat Insurance Shopping Tips

October 27, 2014

If you’re in the used boat market, late fall usually offers a good opportunity for buyers. Owners in snow-bound states face haulout and storage expenses for a boat they will only put on the market again in the spring. But before you can start filtering through the used-boat websites looking for desperate sellers (hint: add the search term “reduced”) you’ll want to get a clear picture of what your insurance options are. Back in October 2012, we probed the insurance market for the best rates in various regions and the experts we spoke with offered a number of excellent tips on how to find the right insurance policy at the best rates.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 05:43PM Comments (4)

Calling Mayday on an SSB

October 21, 2014

Based on US Coast Guard statistics, surprisingly few boaters enable the Digital Selective Calling (DSC) function on their VHF radio, or have it operating correctly. From what we are hearing from some marine manufacturers like Icom, the numbers for marine single-sideband (SSB) marine radios—the topic of our ongoing series of tests—are just as discouraging. It doesn't have to be that way. With a few simple tools and maybe a trip to a Radio Shack, getting your radio (VHF or SSB) DSC-ready can be carried in a single weekend.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 11:18AM Comments (5)

Annapolis 2015 Photo Album

October 14, 2014

PS Editor Darrell Nicholson offers his take of the Annapolis boat show in 100 words or less . . . and plenty of photos.
Posted by at 01:03PM Comments (5)

Reflections on the Faux Teak Deck

October 7, 2014

[IMGCAP(1)] Being afflicted by an affection for wooden boats, I’ve always been perplexed by the faux teak trend. In my book, you’re either in love with wood and you pay for your love in labor, or you bow to the apparent pragmatism of plastic. For me, a boatbuilder who is seduced by a synthetic wood deck or trim is akin to Ferdinand the Bull ecstatically romping through a field of plastic flowers—that is to say, more…
Posted by at 02:08PM Comments (3)

Tuning In, Tuning Out

September 30, 2014

Just as the incurable text-sender spends more time staring at his phone than noticing the people around him, sailors intoxicated by their display screens can lose the ability to recognize natural patterns in the weather, the waves, and wind. Nurturing environmental awareness is more than just a matter of safety. To hide behind a digital wall diminishes the art of sailing into something easily quantified, which it simply isn’t. To punch a few buttons and safely sail across a pixelated sea is truly amazing, but it isn’t sailing.
Posted by at 02:18PM Comments (5)

Big News: A Little Girl and a Big Book

September 23, 2014

Technical Editor Ralph Naranjo’s new book, “The Art of Seamanship,” is rolling off the presses at McGraw-Hill. Although it is being billed as a textbook (it will be used in many of the educational programs that Ralph teaches at the Annapolis School of Seamanship) Ralph and the editors at McGraw-Hill have done a terrific job of interspersing meaty instruction on everything from anchoring to riding out a gale with real life stories that Ralph has collected over the years.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 04:35PM Comments (0)

Florida's Anchoring Debate Heats Up

September 17, 2014

The state of Florida is at it again. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission held a couple of poorly advertised “workshops” earlier this month to discuss the future of anchoring in the state. The public hearings made it clear that the state is once again trying to tighten anchoring restrictions in coastal areas, particularly in urban areas along the Intracoastal Waterway.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 02:14AM Comments (5)

The Boat Show Survival Guide

September 10, 2014

Last weekend at the Wooden Boat Festival in Port Townsend, Washington I was reminded of the hidden dangers of boat shows. I was sitting in the cockpit of a custom Ed Monk design offered for sale and had forgotten that I had a mortgage and a job that required regular appearances at an office. I caressed the freshly varnished tiller. It seemed to fit my hand perfectly. “The previous owner sailed it all over the Pacific,” the owner said. I suddenly realized I’d violated the first rule for attending a boat show: Never go alone.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 08:40AM Comments (1)

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