Dealing with Dirty Sails

October 4, 2011 - For washing your sails, most sailmakers recommend using mild soap and water, and avoiding anything abrasive. Use a soft brush, if necessary, to loosen dirt. For dirt or stains that are more deeply embedded, you may need to soak the sail, so you'll have to locate some kind of large container, depending upon the size of the soiled area.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 04:44PM Comments (3)

Making a Case for Sodablasting Your Hull

September 27, 2011 - One of the biggest mistakes an owner makes when estimating how much time it takes to strip bottom paint from a hull is to peck away at one of the easy spots where the paint is peeling and then assume the rest of the coating will come off just as easily. We offer a more realistic formula for estimating the amount of time a stripping project will take.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 11:50AM Comments (11)

Protect Your Boat's Deck From Ice Damage This Winter

September 21, 2011 - If you had niggling leaks at your mast, your forward hatch, or deck hardware this summer, those niggles can become nightmares when freezing temperatures begin to do their sledgehammer work upon our boats—as well as our psyches—this winter. Once water enters the core of your deck through a small leak, it can often spread unnoticed. Bring on winter, and its freezing and thawing cycles, and the core begins to break down.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 11:46AM Comments (0)

Sizing Up the Autumn List

September 13, 2011 - Some of the best sailing I ever had was September on Narragansett Bay, pretty close to heaven in my mind. But before we let a long September reach carry us away—and hopefully carry us through winter—it’s a good time to take out a pen and pad, and start to build the winter work list.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 12:12PM Comments (1)

A Most Appropriate Malapropism

September 7, 2011 - I know plenty of sailors who wouldn’t hesitate to curse a J\24. I should mention that these are mostly racing sailors, and they do a lot of cursing.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 11:39AM Comments (10)

Choosing a Bottom Paint for Dummies

August 31, 2011 - Before plunking down nearly $100 or more a gallon for bottom paint, consider where your priorities lie.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 01:35PM Comments (6)

In Search of the Perfect Portable Boarding Ladder

August 23, 2011 - Last year, we ran a review of a Union 36, and the opening photo of the boat featured a unique folding ladder that I hadn’t seen before. The ladder, instead of hanging vertically, folded out at a comfortable angle in a way that seemed—at least in the photo—pretty practical for routine boarding. One problem: the maker—the American Ladder Corp., based in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., appears to be out of business.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 11:53AM Comments (2)

Understanding Practical Sailor's Ratings System

August 17, 2011 - Most long-time readers are familiar with our ratings categories—Best Choice, Recommended, and Budget Buy—but their significance might not be so obvious to new readers. In fact, we’ve received a number of letters from people asking us to clarify what these ratings mean. So, here it is.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 09:51AM Comments (3)

West Marine Issues Notices on Rocna Anchors

August 10, 2011 - In the wake of questions about the tensile strength of steel used in the shafts of Rocna anchors, West Marine has issued “product specification notices” to customers who have purchased Rocna anchors since 2010. The West Marine notification states that certain Rocna anchors were made with a “weaker grade of steel compared to that published on the Rocna website” and directs customers to Rocna for information regarding the materials and construction of the Rocna anchor. Under its “No Hassles Guarantee,” West Marine offers a full refund to owners who are not satisfied with their purchase. The offer comes after several months of heated online debate over the strength of the shafts of Rocna anchors made in China.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 12:18PM Comments (6)

Small Boats with Full-batten Mainsails Have Few Options for Reducing Luff-slide Friction

August 2, 2011 - One of the difficult challenges faced by mast slides on full-batten mainsails are the side loads imposed when the sail is not feathered into the wind. In the event that the sail needs to be dropped (or raised) off the wind, the unequal loading on the batten cars can cause a great deal of friction on one side of the cars. If you are the owner of a smaller boat, however, your options for solving this problem are limited.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 10:31AM Comments (2)

Manual vs. Automatic Inflatable Life Jacket / Safety Harnesses

July 26, 2011 - Commonsense would suggest that an auto-inflating harness/life jacket is the best choice for the cruising sailor. However, there are cases in which an inflated harness can be a hindrance—for example when you are trying to climb back aboard under a lifeline, or dive free of debris or rigging. And as our tests have shown, rain and waves can inflate some models, a nuisance that could interfere with handling the boat.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 01:55PM Comments (12)

PS Repeats Tether Release Warning in Wake of Chicago-Mackinac Race Fatalities

July 19, 2011 - While there is no evidence yet that the fatal sailing accident in the Chicago-Mackinac Race this week is linked to a safety tether problem, given our experience with tethers, it is not unreasonable to suspect that the difficulty involved in releasing safety tethers may have been a factor.
Posted by at 02:56PM Comments (5)

How Do You Cleat a Line on a Boat?

July 18, 2011 - "How to cleat a line on a boat" turns out to be a more controversial topic than you might imagine. Practical Sailor looks at various views on how to handle the first wrap around the base of a deck cleat.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 12:18PM Comments (3)

The Fundamentals of Mainsail Trim

July 13, 2011 - While you don’t have to be an incurable sail-tweaker to cover ground on a tradewind passage, assuring your mainsail is well-trimmed will put you safely on the hook sooner and ensure a smoother, more comfortable ride. Good mainsail trim, of course, is paramount when going to windward.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 10:24AM Comments (9)

Navigating by iPad Using eSeaChart and ActiveCaptain

July 6, 2011 - In advance of a recent summer coastal cruise, we downloaded eSeaChart navigation app, the first iPad charting program to work with Active Captain, a free service that requires registration. It cost $8 and took only a few minutes to download the charts needed for the cruising area—from Tampa to Ft. Myers, Fla.—including detailed harbor charts. One thing I liked about the charts was that they were raster charts, nearly identical to the government versions that appeal to my analog brain. Redraw rates were a little slow, as a result, but at sailboat speeds, this isn’t a major issue.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 09:37AM Comments (2)