Summer Squall Sailing Tactics

June 15, 2016 - The danger in running before the squall (or tacking downwind, a tactic sometimes employed by Transpac racers) is the inevitable wind shift that can cause an accidental jibe. Since squalls are usually short lived, with the strongest winds lasting less than 20 minutes, simply reducing sail to a safe configuration and motoring through is a less taxing approach. What is a "safe" configuration? Gusts much over 40 knots are not common, but some devastating downbursts in excess of 50 knots can occur in volatile areas. (The fatal squall line that struck the fleet in the 2011 Chicago-Mac race is a good example).
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 05:42AM Comments (1)

Tool Buying Guide for the Cruising Sailor

June 8, 2016 - When it takes longer to find the right tool for the job than to actually complete the job, consider creating your own “doctor’s bag” of boat tools. In this week’s Inside Practical Sailor blog, you’ll find great advice on taming your toolbox from veteran circumnavigator Evans Starzinger, as well as links to some of our most popular tests of hand tools and power tools—just in time for Father's Day.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 08:36AM Comments (4)

Hurricane Season: Dr. William Gray's Final Forecast

May 31, 2016 - About ten years after Jimmy Buffet first sang about the futility of reasoning with hurricane season, Dr. William Gray was figuring out how. This week, the scientists at Colorado State University carried on a tradition begun by Gray more than 30 years ago when they released their annual prediction for the North Atlantic hurricane season. The forecast predicts the number of named storms, the number of hurricanes, the number of major hurricanes, and the number of days that at least one named storm will be roaming the region this year.
Posted by Darrell H. Nicholson at 04:05PM Comments (1)

Extending the Life of Your New Paint Job

May 25, 2016 - The results of a professionally applied polyurethane topside refinish are as dramatic as the invoice that accompanies the makeover. The shiny, wet look and the protection it affords can last for years—whether it’s three years, five years, or nearly a decade depends upon how kindly the rejuvenated surface is treated. Two-part polyester urethane coatings such as Awlgrip II are tough, gloss-retaining coatings that will put up with some abrasion, but an aggressive buffing routine can shorten the life of the coating.
Posted by Practical Sailor at 08:43AM Comments (0)

Quick and Easy Gelcoat Repair

May 17, 2016 - When making gelcoat repairs, the Preval Sprayer combines the best of the Badger 250 and the paint brush. It's quick to set up and clean, and provides adequate coverage in a single application. Best of all, it's available in auto supply and hardware stores for just $7, so when you are done with it, you can just throw it away.
Posted by at 02:25PM Comments (4)

Revisiting the Cherubini Hunter 30

May 10, 2016 - While Hunter’s marketing genius is enviable, the true achievement in its early boats like the John Cherubini-designed Hunter 30 is that they’ve managed to endure at all. The Hunter 30 was launched on the wake of the 1973 oil embargo, and the design survived through nine years of stagflation and rising unemployment. Fortunately, significant improvements in fiberglass construction methods coincided with the need for lower production costs. Selling sailboats could still be lucrative, but profitability in the mid-price ranges often required a few corners to be cut.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 02:09PM Comments (0)

Fast and Easy Rope Cleaning

May 3, 2016 - If you didn’t remove your running rigging last winter, then there is a good chance that you'll be coming back to sheets and halyards coated in dirt, mold, and mildew. What now? Here are some useful tips or cleaning cordage that we gathered from leading rope manufacturers and riggers.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson and Drew Frye at 11:53PM Comments (3)

Hidden Risks of Life Jackets

April 26, 2016 - Testing any sailing equipment entails a high degree of responsibility, but this is especially true of safety equipment. A tragic accident off the coast of Costa Rica this week called to mind an important study that Practical Sailor did in March of 2013 on the dangers that life jackets can pose to sailors in the event of a capsize. No one will challenge the fact that life jackets save far, far more lives than they ever put at risk, and the accident in Costa Rica is proof of this. However, sailors need to be aware that in certain rare circumstances a life jacket can be an impediment to keeping you alive.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson with Ralph Naranjo at 02:22PM Comments (2)

Can a Snubber Hook Weaken Your Rode?

April 20, 2016 - In the March 2016 article “Changing views on chain hooks,” we pointed out that the major manufacturers of marine anchor chains caution that some chain hooks can weaken chains under extreme loads. These chain hooks are often used to attach an anchor snubber to the anchor chain. We confirmed this effect with testing and advised that if you want to use a hook on your anchor snubber, you should choose a hook that doesn’t weaken the chain through point-loading (concentrating shock loads on a small area of the chain link). Greg Kutsen, president of Mantus, the maker of one of the chain hooks that we tested, contends that the real-life loads encountered when anchoring with a snubber are not significant enough to worry about any point-loading caused by the hook on the chain. Kutsen explains the reasons for his view here.
Posted by at 07:12AM Comments (2)

Keel Bolt Repair Options

April 13, 2016 - In a few of our past reports on boat financing, Practical Sailor discussed how to pre-inspect your potential dreamboat before committing to the next step and how to bring in a surveyor. Although the articles are geared to the prospective buyer, it is just as relevant to the owner of an older boat. If the boat in question has more than 20 years behind her, one item that will likely come up on a survey is keel bolts - the heavy duty fasteners that keep your keel from going on a bottom tour while you reach for handholds on your suddenly tippy craft.
Posted by at 12:00AM Comments (2)

Clipper Fatality Highlights Adventure Sail Risks

April 5, 2016 - Most conclude that football is a contact sport and that sailing takes the other tack. But after the amateur crew aboard the 75-foot ocean racer IchorCoal suffered its second fatality in six months, many have suggested that it’s time to take a closer look at just what went wrong and what’s really at stake in pay-to-play big boat ocean racing.
Posted by Ralph Naranjo at 03:29PM Comments (5)

Choosing a Sailmaker

March 28, 2016 - If you are planning to add a new mainsail or genoa during the Northeast winter, now is the most likely time to be able to negotiate a good price. While the migration to high-volume lofts abroad has smoothed the peaks and valleys of sail prices, there are still seasonal bargains to be had. Generally, the lull occurs October through December. By the time spring rolls around and the sailmakers find themselves swimming…
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 10:59AM Comments (3)

Tips for the Havana Daydreamer

March 23, 2016 - Now that U.S. sailors can so easily can go to Cuba, the question remains should they go? I think most cruisers would not want to miss the chance. To explore the reefs of the fabled Jardínes de la Reina, to reach close along the green mountains between Punta Maisi and Boracoa, to wander the streets of La Habana— what more could the cruising life offer than to explore far (and not so far) corners of the world under sail? If you are Havana daydreaming here are some helpful resources to set you on your way.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 10:32AM Comments (1)

Florida Anchoring Battles Begin Anew

March 15, 2016 - While the Florida Senate approved House Bill 1051 prohibiting anchoring in parts of Miami-Dade County, over on Florida’s west coast, a live-aboard sailor was still working to have his 36-foot Hunter hauled off the beach. Although the two events would at first seem unrelated, any sailor would likely see a clear connection.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 10:49AM Comments (3)

Safe Navigation in Poorly Charted Waters

March 9, 2016 - I often worry that the topic of chart accuracy, which we revisit in the upcoming April issue of Practical Sailor, downplays the importance of other skills, published sources, and equipment we should use to solve a navigational puzzle. A recent bottom-scraping cruise I took along the ever-changing coast of Southwest Florida reiterated some key points regarding coastal navigation.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 05:19AM Comments (3)