Conquering (or Coexisting with) Waterline Stains

April 29, 2014

Sometime in mid-April, our regrets for jobs left undone set in. The raw-water intake blossoming with barnacles, the brown waterline stains, the heat exchanger in need of a good cleanse—these can all wait until spring. Well, spring is here, and our routine maintenance chores now require some serious elbow grease. Our first impulse is to go for the super-strength acids that will take care of the hard growth as well as the stains, but there are kinder, gentler options, if you have the willpower and the patience.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 03:58PM Comments (3)

Simple Tips for Maintaining Stainless Steel

April 22, 2014

When applying a paste cleaner, a toothbrush is useful for buffing tight spots and working into the pores of welds; follow by buffing with a cotton cloth. A green 3M scrubby pad helps for removing more aggressive stains. Continued rusting in welded areas might indicate a developing failure, requiring replacement. Rinse thoroughly with fresh water and mild soap when done buffing.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 01:43PM Comments (4)

Rope Washing Advice from the Pros

April 15, 2014

The rope should be tightly coiled or tied in a daisy-chain, and then placed inside a pillowcase. Front-loading washing machines are recommended; an up-and-down motion is preferable to the rotary motion of most common household machines. Without coiling or daisy-chaining, a rope can turn into an impressive tangle. The pillowcase further restricts the motion of the rope and prevents the rope from wrapping around the central agitator, which can destroy ropes and break washing machines.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 12:02PM Comments (4)

Rebel Heart and Emergencies at Sea

April 8, 2014

The story of the rescue of a sick 1-year-old girl, her parents, and toddler sister from aboard the boat Rebel Heart last week provoked a storm of controversy over whether ocean voyaging with young children is sensible. One of the reasons that Theresa and I chose not to have and raise children aboard our boat were our own dicey experiences with illness in the tropics. (Our threadbare, vagabond lifestyle at the time raised other salient concerns, as Theresa put it—“I’m not giving birth in the forepeak!”) But if we had decided to cruise with young children, we would have likely avoided long passages and kept pediatric care within close reach.
Posted by By Darrell Nicholson at 01:21PM Comments (14)

Doing 'The Ditch' Capt. Frank's Way

April 1, 2014

Be aware that a less-experienced sailor’s report of a “great” anchorage with plenty of depth, or statements like “We ran aground here!” don’t do you much good if they fail to include basic info such as their boat's draft, state of the tide, etc. Other sailors' facility reviews should also be taken with a grain of salt. For example: “The dockmaster hates Algerian Snaggle-tooth Poodles (like our Fluffy), so we’re never coming back, and you shouldn’t either!”
Posted by Frank Lanier at 03:24PM Comments (6)

Upgrading the Cruising Mainsail

March 25, 2014

The old main was constructed of Dacron, and polyester continued to offer the best balance of cost, longevity, and performance for our particular situation. We decided to go with a premium-grade polyester (Dimension 360AP-MTO 8.4 ounce). Premium polyester is tightly woven and has a high yarn count that provides good shape retention and good performance over a wide range of wind speeds.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 01:17PM Comments (1)

The Pro's Guide to Restoring Gelcoat

March 18, 2014

This week's blog on restoring old hulls includes tips like this one on wet-sanding: If you’re using an electric sander, mist the hull surface with a spray bottle. Mix a few drops of dish detergent in the water to keep the hull evenly wet and keep it wetter longer. Rinse the surface often to look for potential burn-through areas, and look at it from several angles. You can use a window squeegee to quick dry the surface after a rinse to get a low-glare look at the gelcoat. Do not use circular movements. Wet-sand until the hull has an even dullness, a matte finish; then rinse with fresh water.
Posted by Ann Key at 10:42AM Comments (4)

PS Gear Tests Reap Awards

March 7, 2014

As I edge toward my 200th blog post and my 10th year as the editor of Practical Sailor, I’m going to detour briefly from the usual fare to say thanks, to you our readers, and to the loyal group of testers who have brought this publication to where it is today—the top of the heap in its field. This fact was recognized last month at the annual meeting of Boating Writers International, a professional organization of writers, editors, publishers, photographers, broadcasters, public relations specialists, and others in the communications profession associated with the boating industry.
Posted by By Darrell Nicholson at 06:16PM Comments (4)

Digging into Bottom Paint Removal

March 4, 2014

Paint removal using a paint stripper is a little like dental work in that there’s no one perfect tool, and getting the job done usually requires a tray full of devices. The arsenal of hand-scraping weapons used during our test of paint strippers ranged in caliber from a lightweight, extra-thin and narrow scraper sharpened to a knife’s edge to what old shipwrights referred to as a “slick.” This heavyweight king of the chisel family was kept sharpened with a whetstone and had the mass to plow into thick paint buildup and peel the substrate evenly.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 01:03AM Comments (6)

Gel vs. AGM Batteries for Boats

February 24, 2014

As spring fast approaches (it's coming, I promise), a few of our less fortunate sailing brethren discover their house bank batteries can no longer hold a charge. One of the most common questions we get regarding deep-discharge batteries—those batteries designed to power our lights and electronics—is whether to go with a gel-cell, AGM, or flooded lead-acid “wet-cell” battery.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 03:02PM Comments (10)

Impossible Dream Finds a New Home

February 18, 2014

At about 9 p.m., the wind picked up and the temperature dropped to 56 degrees, Miami’s version of the polar vortex. Sailing conservatively under staysail and main, the 60-foot catamaran ripped southward toward the city lights. Tucked behind the 18-inch wheel on the leeward hull, helmsman Harry Horgan, a wheelchair-bound sailor who founded one of the nation’s finest community sailing programs, squinted into the wind. To the west, the nearly full moon rose above Cape Florida Lighthouse.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 11:54AM Comments (2)

LPG Explosion Kills Sailor in Guatemala

February 11, 2014

Three days after I blogged about the risks of having liquid petroleum gas (LPG) onboard boats, and shared frequent PS contributor and surveyor Capt. Frank Lanier’s tips on checking for leaks, an LPG explosion killed a Swedish sailor who was docked in Livingston, Guatemala. In the upcoming March 2013 issue of Practical Sailor, Lanier goes over LPG safety from top to bottom, and I hope everyone will read the article carefully. The article is an introduction to a series of tests comparing products found in the LPG system—ranging from tanks to valves, from aftermarket lockers to solenoid valves.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 11:55AM Comments (5)

The (Cold) Case of the Frozen Antifreeze

February 3, 2014

There’s nothing like buying several $3 bottles of antifreeze to protect your $30,000 boat, then coming home to discover the unused bottles frozen solid in your garage.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 01:13AM Comments (4)

Sailboat Rig Inspection Tips

January 27, 2014

How frequently do you bother removing spreader boots and taping to check the condition of the spreaders and rigging? No matter how well the spreader ends are protected, and whether you use ready-made vinyl spreader boots or conventional rigging tape, water will get through to the fittings inside. On a boat used in salt water, the atmosphere's corrosive nature can cause rapid disintegration of aluminum fittings (nevermind the fact that the spreaders might be 25 feet or more off the water). The thorough taping job you did on the spreader ends may actually accelerate the problem by holding in water.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 11:13PM Comments (6)

The Short, Brutish Life of a Luxury Cat

January 21, 2014

Last week, Charlie Doane, executive editor of Sail magazine, and Hank Schmitt, a delivery skipper and founder of the North American Rally for Cruisers, got caught in a very bad situation on a new-boat delivery in the Atlantic. The boat's new owners, a couple from Germany, were also on board. The boat was a brand-new Aeroyacht Alpha 42 catamaran with wave-piercing hulls. It was abandoned; the captain and crew were rescued by U.S. Coast Guard helicopter. The boat was left to drift. Even those of us who are not in the market for a luxury catamaran can draw something from the incident.
Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 01:40AM Comments (12)

Reader Questionnaire

Which of the following best describes your approach to bottom paint?