Welcome (Part II) and Meet the Skipper

Posted by Darrell Nicholson at 03:53PM - Comments: (1)

April 8, 2011

In keeping with this blog's theme of offering a glimpse of what's going on "inside" Practical Sailor, this post—our second since we've revamped the new website—will offer a brief introduction to who is behind these missives. Most of the posts from the old Inside Practical Sailor blog have been transferred over here, but a few entries, including biographies of other crew at Practical Sailor have not. We'll find a home for these at the Practical-sailor.com soon.

Although I hope to feature some guest columnists, I'm the one who will be writing most of these posts. I am the editor of Practical Sailor, ultimately responsible for what goes into the magazine. I usually handle crew complaints gracefully, so don't hesitate to gripe. (Praise is nice, too.) Keeping Practical Sailor on course is a monumental responsibility, one that I and everyone who works with us takes very seriously. There is a special bond between sailors, and we regard our readers as an extension of our family. We don't want to let you down. If you're unfamiliar with the publication, here's a brief YouTube video giving some background.

Please let me know if you have any questions about the new website. If you are digging around for back articles and are having trouble, try out the "advanced search" feature to narrow your results. If you still can't find it, contact me. For now, I'll post new blogs once or twice a week. I hope you also subscribe to our free e-letter Waypoints, which offers wide range of practical tips on maintaining boats and equipment, and making your sailing safer and more enjoyable.

Darrell Nicholson, Editor of Practical Sailor

A bit about me:

I grew up sailing in South Florida (Biscayne Bay) and worked for a small newspaper before setting out from Miami aboard a 60-year-old wooden William Atkin ketch named Tosca. For 11 years, my lovely and tolerant wife, Theresa, and I explored the Caribbean, the Pacific, and Southeast Asia aboard Tosca, documenting our adventures for various newspapers, travel magazines, and sailing publications. We lived in Portsmouth, R.I. for five years, where I was senior editor at Cruising World and both our sons were born. I hold a U.S. Coast Guard 100-ton masters license and have worked on a variety of commercial fishing and charter boats.

The sea, boats, and the people who sail them have made a inestimable impact on my life. I've worked for a variety of different publications, but Practical Sailor, because of its mission and no-advertising format, has put me in a better position to honor my debt to the sailing community. The new open-archives format website reflects our commitment to this cause. I hope you enjoy following my posts and look forward to hearing from you. I sincerely thank you for your support.

A bit more about me:

1. Age 46

2. Size Easily stuffs into most lazarettes

3. Weight Same as an 8D lead-acid battery

4. Hometown Osprey, Florida.

5. First boat El Toro (age 10)

6. Dream boat Varies by the hour. At the moment, Atkin's Tally Ho Major

7. Best Cruising Memory Landfall at Fatu Hiva, Marquesas

8. Worst Cruising Memory Typhoon Paka in Guam

9. Favorite Racing Moments Wed. Nights with Shake-a-Leg (now Sail to Prevail)

10. Currently reading "The Shadow-Line" by Joseph Conrad

Comments (1)

Hello, I almost bought an Atkins flush or raised deck ketch(can't remember which) after she washed ashore in Staten Island in 1973. She was made of long leaf yellow pine and I might still have a button head nail removed from her. The fellow who owned her lived in Florida and when I approached him with the $2,000.00 he had changed his mind. I saw again in Dania, Florida(I had moved to Florida and started a boat repair company). I saw twice more when I tried buying her from River Bend Marina and later at Bojeans yard on the Miami River. If this is the same boat I know alot about her. Rick

Posted by: Rick | May 20, 2013 3:55 PM    Report this comment


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