June 2004

PS Advisor: 06/04

EPIRB Test

Subscribers Only An independent evaluation of GPS-equipped 406-MHz EPIRBs leads to the suspension of sales of two models from McMurdo.

Chandlery 06/04: Tape Wars and Defender Stow Bag

Subscribers Only

Battery Boxes and Trays

Subscribers Only In fully covered battery boxes, we like the pricy Blue Seas. If tray-type hold-downs are your preference, go for West or Gil.

Non-Skid Compounds and Paints

Subscribers Only We continue our experiments in finding combinations of paint and non-skid compounds that provide more traction with less abrasion, and longevity without gnarliness.

Telstar 28

Subscribers Only Though a predecessor went by the Telstar name in the '80s, the T2 is brand new in every sense.

Water Repellents for Fabric

303 Fabric Guard outdoes our old favorite, Scotch Gard Heavy Duty, for about the same price. ReviveX is another top performer, but costs a lot per ounce.

Headings: Navigation, Then and Now

Subscribers Only Between Marion-Bermuda and Newport-Bermuda events, June 18 will mark Nick Nicholson's 18th race to the Onion Patch, and his 25th year as an offshore navigator. He compares the racing navigator's role and methods in 1979 with those in 2004.

Garmin 188C vs. Si-Tex Combo

Subscribers Only In a two-on-one chartplotter/sounder shootout, a pair of Si-Tex units takes on a single Garmin combo machine.

Color Plotter/Sounders: Furuno's GP-1850 WF and Simrad's CE 33

Subscribers Only Furuno's upgraded screen tilts the balance against the feature-rich Simrad.

Mailport: 06/04

Change of Watch

Inside Practical Sailor Blog

What Old Gear Do You Swear By (or at)?

by Darrell Nicholson on July 09, 2014

Instead of fixing or replacing tired mechanical equipment with new gear, we can often find a less-expensive substitute on the used-gear market. In many cases, this is equipment that is just as good as new gear, if not better than new. The trick is separating the gems from the junk. A poster child for this sort of refit quandary is the old Simpson Lawrence manual windlass, a British-engineered oddity that has long been a source of cruising sailor ire. Commonly found on cruising boats made in the 1980s, these windlasses use a troublesome chain drive rather than a gear drive. This, along with the dissimilar metals used in its various components (cast-steel gypsy, aluminum case, etc.), make these windlasses a poor candidate for rebuilding.

Read More

Reader Questionnaire

Which of the following best describes your approach to bottom paint?