Anchoring & Mooring

The maker of the Kong ball-and-socket swivel (top photo) suggests adding a chain leader between the anchor and the swivel to avoid side loading. An eye-and-eye, galvanized cup swivel (bottom) is easy to inspect for corrosion. A bow shackle between the chain and anchor prevents side loading and allows for an oversized, load-rated swivel that will exceed the chain’s tensile strength.

Anchor Swivels: Caution Required

Stroll down the docks at any boat show, and you’ll see a surprising number of boats equipped with expensive, stainless-steel swivels between the anchor and the chain. Almost all of these swivels are highly polished, machined and/or welded gems that cost anywhere from $80 to $200 or more. By comparison, a galvanized anchor shackle rated to withstand the same or greater loads as the chain rode we rely on costs less than $15.

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