DIY Projects

Unless you’re a carpenter, mechanic, and fiberglass repair expert, this storm damaged Morgan 41 Out Island would be a challenging project. Several nearly cruise-ready Out Island’s are on the market that might be a more cost-effective option to this salvage job.

Fixing the Storm-Damaged Boat

With $655 million dollars marine vessel insurance claims from the 2017 hurricanes Harvey and Irma, there is no shortage of broken boats accumulating in salvage yards. The nation’s three big damaged boat liquidators — Certified Sales, Cooper Capital and U.S. Auctions are gradually thinning out their listings from Irma and Harvey, but Florence will surely bring a new crop. But just how “salvageable” are these boats?

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More DIY Projects

DIY Materials Testing

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Simple Sail Repair

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Make a Mini Dodger

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A Stronger Screwhole Repair

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Staying Safe in the Boatyard

My pal Jimmy’s inflatable dinghy sprung a leak. It was a simple repair. He hoisted the boat aboard, put a wire...