Systems & Propulsion

Fabric Hatch Vents: The Breeze Booster Outdraws Windscoop

Breeze Booster preferred over three other brands.

Special Section – VentillationLet the Merry Breezes Blow!

Our comprehensive evaluation of ventilation accessories breaks them into four distinct categories: fans, fabric scoops, cowls and mushroom vents.

Fabric Hatch Vents: The Breeze Booster Outdraws Windscoop

Breeze Booster preferred over three other brands.

Special Section – VentillationLet the Merry Breezes Blow!

Our comprehensive evaluation of ventilation accessories breaks them into four distinct categories: fans, fabric scoops, cowls and mushroom vents.

Offshore Log: An Evolution in EPIRBs

New GPS-connected EPIRBs and ACR's forthcoming Personal Locator Beacon promise to improve search and rescue operations at sea.

Spare Parts

Kenyon InstrumentsReader Ernie Copp owns some old Kenyon instruments. The company has long been out of business. Following his successful search to find someone...

Soundown and Hough Put a Lid on Engine Noise

Engines make noise. Crew-especially when theyre trying to hold a conversation, sleep, or just relax-don't like noise. The solution? Isolate the crew from the engine noise and vibration. In this update of our May 1, 1993 report, 10 sound-attenuating products are tested and ranked.

Battery Power Packs: Are They Too Good to Be True?

Batteries dead? Need to jump start your engine? We test four 17-lb., 17-Ah power packs that can do that job and others. The most expensive is also the best-the Solar ES-5000.

Top 10 Products for 1999

Our annual selection of outstanding equipment, headlined this year by the Spade anchor, Nexus instruments and the Isotemp water heater.

Battery Power Packs: Are They Too Good to Be True?

Batteries dead? Need to jump start your engine? We test four 17-lb., 17-Ah power packs that can do that job and others. The most expensive is also the best-the Solar ES-5000.

The Pros and Cons of Leaving Your Mast Up for Winter

If you are like us, you may feel strangely guilty about leaving a mast up during winter storage. In our case, it is probably those old wooden spar days calling. Ideally, wooden spars need to come down and be sheltered and coddled at regular intervals. Aluminum masts really don't, and the sky is actually a decent place to store them.