Features September 2018 Issue

Clearing the Air Around Odor Testing

marine head odor testing
Drew Frye

After several rounds of chemical testing for holding tanks, we have got this stink detection down to a science.

Because the masking chemicals are more effective in in port-a-potty applications, there is only one true measure of effectiveness: whether the toilet still stinks after it is “flushed.“

marine head odor testing
Drew Frye

Since calibrating noses presents certain challenges, it’s nice to have an analytical number to compare as well. A hydrogen sulfide monitor, of the type used to test sewer gas, was used to back-up our sniff testing

We measured hydrogen sulfide (H2S) levels in the holding chamber, using a Honeywell Gas Alert Quattro meter.

marine head odor testing
Drew Frye

1. The door to the “lab,” a pre-fabricated shed, bears a chilling warning

2. As we did in our holding tank test, we used five-gallon buckets in place of the port-a-potty waste tank. They were only partially filled for the test.

marine head odor testing
Drew Frye

3. The Reliance “Double Duty” bags works with its own camp-style toilets, but don’t fit well with marine port-a-potties.

4. The Toilet in a Bag proved to be highly odor resistant and strong. The bags cost a dollar each and the package comes with odor absorbing gel and a scoop for adding the gel.

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